Object Challenge

This week, instead of a prompt, I’m going to set you a bit of a challenge! I have to be honest, I’ve pinched this idea from Peter Sansom’s excellent book ‘Writing Poems’ (available from Amazon and other bookshops (if they’re open…)), in which he has a whole chapter on ‘Workshops and Writing Games’. For this one he suggests writing in the voice of an object and gives various suggestions, including writing as:

A vacuum cleaner in shop window
A wardrobe in a hotel bedroom
A spoon in a bedsitter
A motorbike in pieces on a kitchen floor
A safety match in a box in a cardigan pocket

There are several more, but you get the gist, and of course you can think of your own examples.

Although I’ve filched these ideas from a book about writing poetry, I’m pretty sure you could use them as a starting point for a piece of fiction too. As always, use your imagination, let the pen fly across the page (or fingers across the keyboard), and just start writing. Can’t wait to see your work!

‘Waving’ by Barrie Purnell

Thanks to Barrie for writing this moving poem in response to this week’s prompt ‘Wave’.

I am waving to the lovers
About to leave each other’s side
Having given each other everything
They have nothing left to hide,
Although she holds her head up high
Her eyelids are hanging low,
She didn’t have the courage
To say she didn’t want to go.

I am waving to the immigrants
Setting sail for shores unknown,
With a handful of false promises
And nowhere to call home,
Their ship sails on forever
On an ocean of their fears,
The image of our indifference
Reflecting in their tears.

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Prompt for the week

We can’t get away from them these days, so this week’s prompt is:

MASK

Now, apart from the obvious current use to keep infection at bay, there seems to be a vast array of masks as well as reasons to wear them. There is, of course, masked balls (never been to one, have you?), those fancy Venetian masks, gas masks, the masks bank robbers wear, or disguises, masks of famous people… well, I could go on, but I’m sure you’ll be able to think of other examples for yourselves. Don’t forget, you can write in any format: fiction; poetry; creative non-fiction; or even a script (haven’t seen any of those for a while.. give it a go!). Have fun with it! We look forward to reading your work.

‘The Book Keeper’ by Barrie Purnell

Barrie wrote this wonderful and imaginative piece in response to last week’s picture prompt. Please do share yours with us too.

I’ve travelled across an ocean of unused words,
Climbed over the high walls of my pride,
Pushed through a forest of rejections
Only to find her on the other side.

She was the custodian of every written word
Who looked upon all writers with disdain,
Working with her soulless keeper of books
It’s metal hand recording each author’s name.

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Prompt of the Week

Happy New Year everyone! Hope you all had a good Christmas break and are looking forward to even more writing output in 2020!

Well, its a New Year, a new decade, I’m sure you must have had a few new things for Christmas, and lets face it, there is plenty of news going on at the moment, so can you guess what the next prompt is? Yup, its:

New

Approach it any way you like – poetry, prose, flash fiction, creative non-fiction, or what about a script? Why don’t you step outside of your comfort zone for this one (start as you mean to go on eh?) and try something different. A different tense/perspective/style can give a real boost to your writing. Go on, have a go! I look forward to reading the results.

Prompt for the Week

Some of us were privileged enough to attend our leaders, Kevin Murphy’s, recent birthday bash, and what a lovely do it was too! (Excuse me if I just take a moment to thank Kevin’s wife, Diane, for providing us with such a scrumptious spread, it was amazing!) The event inspired this week’s prompt of

Party

Of course, your piece doesn’t have to be about a birthday party, it can be about any ol’ sort, and I have to say I amazed myself with the number of options I came up with when I started thinking about it: Hen/stag parties; Christmas parties (office or otherwise!); party lines (I’m very old – I remember these!); partition walls; political parties (ooh very topical); oh and of course, shooting parties (just sayin’)! There are loads more too – who knew that ‘party’ was such a versatile word, and think of all the different settings you can give them.

As always it can be prose, poetry, flash fiction – anything you like.

Well, I’m off now to start writing, hope you do the same…. we’ll look forward to reading your work.

Prompt for the Week

Here in Retford the rain this week has been pretty biblical with lots of flooding creating havoc locally. So this week, it seems appropriate to go with the prompt of

Flood

Use it any way you like – the obvious; flooded roads and fields, floods of tears, or the not so obvious; outpouring of words; flooded with relief… that sort of thing. I’m sure you can think up a few original and fun ways to use it! We look forward to reading your ideas.

A Sea of Troubles – by Andrew Bell

Ladies and Gentlemen, members of this awesome dissembly,

It is my privilege to shriek to you today through the medium of space, without rinsing my worms; to look back to our future; to explore how we may embrace a sea change in our shrinking, free from excessive red tape, pies in the sky or other porkies and assorted paper tigers; to discover, here and now, where we need to stand firm, but also, to find those moments when we need to move on to better timing. And above all, I urge you, with all my sinews, to hold up your palms, especially to this sea of bubbles (and its associated cant and froth), and by opposing, see it off. For, when all else fails, we need to stand above the crowd, cut through this jungle and tangle: all those lies embedded in convention, to reach an avon of peace and contention.

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Scratch by Michael Keeble

“It’s just a scratch” said my wife

Of course, when they say that in the movies, they have endured a barrage of bullets from any number of generally incompetent antagonists and at least one of them will have penetrated a useful limb.  Having been thus injured, hero would reach for his rolled up newspaper and put them off their already poor aim by using it as a blowpipe to blast the nearest gunman with peanuts from a handy nearby bowl.  Having dispatched all his enemies with deadly peanuts and newsprint jabs, he uses his newspaper to bind up the flesh wound that has rendered his left arm useless, and coolly makes his way out of the building and into the crowded streets. 

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